Dr. Oliva’s 2017 Expedition

Dr Oliva’s 2017 Expedition

In February 2017, Dr. Matt Oliva ventured to Myanmar to work with corneal surgeons at Yangon Eye Hospital. Throughout the campaign, Dr. Oliva assisted local ophthalmologists in performing corneal transplants, delivered lectures on surgical techniques, and conducted trainings with ophthalmology residents.

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FDA Approves New Therapeutic Treatment for Progressive Keratoconus

KXL SystemAvedro, Inc., an ophthalmic pharmaceutical and medical device company, has received approval from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for Photrexa Viscous, Photrexa and the KXL System. Together, this new system represents a significant milestone in the treatment of keratoconus, a progressive eye disease that causes a thinning of the cornea.

The KXL System is made for use with a keratoconus treatment option called corneal collagen cross linking, which uses riboflavin and UV light to strengthen the weakened cornea caused by the disease. This treatment is often performed in addition to the use of intacs, which are plastic polymer implants inserted into the cornea to […]

HBO features Dr. Matt Oliva and the Himalayan Cataract Project

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Season Four of of the Emmy­-winning television series VICE on HBO features a compelling segment titled “Beating Blindness” that features Medical Eye Center’s cornea specialist, Dr. Matt Oliva. Correspondent Isobel Yeung travels to Ethiopia to meet Dr. Oliva while working with the Himalayan Cataract Project. While in Ethiopia, Isobel shadows Dr. Oliva and the surgical team as they perform nearly 700 surgeries over the course of a week.

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Watching cataract surgery is like witnessing a miracle.

Dr. Sanduk Ruit, a Nepali ophthalmologist

His patients stagger and grope their way to him along mountain trails from remote villages, hoping to go under his scalpel and see loved ones again. A day after he operates to remove cataracts, he pulls off the bandages—and, lo! They can see clearly. At first tentatively, then jubilantly, they gaze about. A few hours later, they walk home, radiating an ineffable bliss.

Dr. Sanduk Ruit, a Nepali ophthalmologist, may be the world champion in the war on blindness. Some 39 million people worldwide are blind—about half because of cataracts—and another 246 million have impaired vision, according to the World Health Organization.

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Providing eye care to a population particularly vulnerable to blindness.

Providing eye care to a population particularly vulnerable to blindness.

Dr. Paul Jorizzo, Dr. Paul Imperia, Dr. Rory Murphy and three assistants from Medical Eye Center returned from Christmas Island in the central Pacific Ocean. They spent a week prescribing treatments, giving away sunglasses, and training local doctors to provide eye care. Drs. Jorizzo and Imperia performed 74 cataract and 10 pterygium surgeries, helping restore vision to a local population that is particularly vulnerable to blindness.

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Our Doctors Deliver Gifts to Christmas (Island)

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Christmas-Island-2013-19

It turns out living in paradise has its drawbacks. Residents of Christmas Island in the Pacific are prone to a “surfer’s disease” caused by exposure to dust, wind, and abundant sunlight. Medical Eye Center surgeons Dr. Paul Imperia and Dr. Paul Jorizzo noticed the situation on a fishing trip years ago. Now they return on a regular basis to treat patients with a variety of eye diseases using modern techniques otherwise unknown in the area.

Dr. Paul Imperia talks to Jefferson Public Radio about his medical mission to Christmas Island.

Listen to the interview…

Medical Eye Center Sponsors Medical Mission to Christmas Island

In August 2015, Medical Eye Center ophthalmologists Paul Jorrizo, MD, and Paul Imperia, MD along with optometrist Rory Murphy, OD are traveling to Christmas Island (also known as Kiritimati) in August to perform more than 120 life-changing eye surgeries that will treat debilitating eye diseases in the local population.

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Keith Shirley Supports Five Ethiopian Hospitals

Maintaining ophthalmic equipment is vital for any hospital, especially where services are few and far between. Keith Shirley, Medical Eye Center’s biomedical engineer, recently traveled to Ethiopia to provide two weeks of training to local biomedical maintenance technicians. On behalf of the Himalayan Cataract Project, Keith worked with nine local technicians at five institutions to examine equipment, make repairs, and provide hands-on guidance and training.

The first medical device Keith tackled was a Pachymeter which had a missing power connector. It would have been impractical to replace the connector due to the age of the device, so Keith cut the connector off and attached the cable directly to the circuit board. The Pachymeter was immediately placed back in service. “I like […]

Nepal Earthquake: Supporting the Relief Effort

On April 25, 2015, a 7.8 magnitude earthquake devastated the Himalayan country of Nepal. The Himalayan Cataract Project (HCP) is taking a leading role in the medical and humanitarian relief efforts throughout the country. HCP has been providing medical services in Nepal for over 20 years. Their remote eye teams have a long-term relationship with many of the rural communities most affected by the earthquake.

The Himalayan Cataract Project’s co-founder Dr. Sanduk Ruit and all of HCP’s partners and friends at the Tilganga Institute of Ophthalmology are safe. The eye hospital is still standing and functioning. Unfortunately, several colleagues have lost their homes and countless acquaintances have died. Many outlying communities and villages are completely destroyed. Power, water, and transportation are […]

Dr. Matt Oliva Receives Humanitarian Award

On June 6th, Dr. Matt Oliva was awarded the 2014 University of Washington School of Medicine Alumni Humanitarian award.

Watch a video that played at the ceremony:

As a medical student, Dr. Matt Oliva did a rotation in Nepal. There, he saw an international team perform 300 cataract surgeries in four days. “It was the genesis moment for me,” says Dr. Oliva. After settling into practice at Medical Eye Center, Dr. Oliva began volunteering with the Himalayan Cataract Project (HCP), which collaborates with local doctors in the developing world to improve eye care. Working in temporary clinics in remote areas, highly efficient physician-nurse teams provide cataract surgery and restore sight to those in need.

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Dr. […]