When to Have an Vision Exam

Unlike going to the dentist, it’s generally not necessary to see your eye doctor every 6 months for a vision exam. Typically, having a comprehensive eye exam every 1-2 years will ensure that your eyes stay healthy and your vision remains sharp. Some patients, such as those with medical conditions like diabetes, eye disorders, high prescriptions or a family history of glaucoma or macular degeneration, require more frequent eye exams.

However, even if you aren’t due for a regular vision exam, there are some signs and symptoms that should alert you to schedule an appointment with your eye doctor. If you experience any of the following symptoms, schedule an eye […]

Understanding How Your Eyes Work

Your eye works in a similar way as a camera. When you look at an object, light reflected from the object enters the eyes through the pupil and is focused through the optical components within the eye.

The front of the eye is made of the cornea, iris, pupil and lens, and they focus the image onto the retina. The retina is the light sensitive membrane that covers the back of the eye. This membrane consists of millions of nerve cells which gather together behind the eye to form a large nerve called the optic nerve.

When the light enters the eye, it is focused to a pinpoint on the macula, a […]

Glaucoma Care

What is Glaucoma?

Glaucoma is an eye disease that causes vision loss in one or both eyes. Glaucoma is caused by fluid buildup behind the eye. This buildup puts pressure on your optic nerve and damages it. If damage to the optic nerve from high eye pressure continues, glaucoma will cause permanent loss of vision. Without treatment, glaucoma can cause total permanent blindness within a few years.

Because most people with glaucoma have no early symptoms or pain from this increased pressure, it is important to see your eye doctor regularly so that glaucoma can be diagnosed and treated before long-term visual loss occurs. In Medford, your doctor can provide a […]

Understanding Refractive Errors

To see clearly, the cornea and the lens of the eye must bend (refract) light rays so they focus on the retina. The retina, a layer of light-sensing cells that line the back of the eye, converts the light rays into impulses that are sent to the brain where they are recognized as images. If the light rays don’t focus on the retina, the image you see will be blurry. This is called a refractive error. Glasses, contact lenses and refractive surgery such as LASIK try to reduce these errors by making light rays focus on the retina.

Any part of the eye that is not perfectly shaped, such as […]

Causes of Light Flashes in Eyes

Many conditions cause photopsia — flashes of light in the eye. Flashes of light can be harmless, or an indicator of a serious eye problem that needs immediate treatment. It is important to be evaluated by an eye doctor for an accurate diagnosis of the cause of light flashes in your eyes. Seek immediate medical attention if your flashes occur with vision loss or small specks that appear to float or dart from side to side in your vision. Below we will review some causes of light flashes in eyes.

Migraines

Migraines are severe recurrent headaches that last from a few hours to several days, often causing visual disturbances. Light flashes often […]

Corrective Lenses

A corrective lens is a lens worn in front of or on the eye, mainly used to treat refractive errors such as myopia, hyperopia, astigmatism and presbyopia. Corrective lenses are designed to help your eyes to focus light properly onto your retina so that you can see clearly. This is done by bending the light rays (before they enter the eye) to the degree required by your given condition.

Glasses

Glasses  are corrective lenses that are worn on the face a short distance in front of the eye. There are several types of glasses, primarily:

  • Monofocal – This type of lens has one focal point. This allows the wearer to either […]

When to Have an Eye Exam

Unlike going to the dentist, it’s generally not necessary to see your eye doctor every 6 months for an eye exam. Typically, having a comprehensive eye exam every 1-2 years will ensure that your eyes stay healthy and your vision remains sharp. Some patients, such as those with medical conditions like diabetes, eye disorders, high prescriptions or a family history of glaucoma or macular degeneration, require more frequent eye exams.

However, even if you aren’t due for a regular eye exam, there are some signs and symptoms that should alert you to schedule an appointment with your eye doctor. If you experience any of the following symptoms, schedule an eye […]

Spring Allergies and Eye Care

For many people, the arrival of spring is a highly-anticipated event. The warmer weather and blooming plants are a welcome change to the chilly winter just endured. While most are happy when spring arrives, for the millions who suffer from seasonal allergies, spring can be a bothersome time.

Allergy sufferers have over-active immune systems. When spring pollens hit, the defense mechanisms in the eyes, nose and throat mistake it for a threat and start working to expel the “invader.” A runny nose and watery eyes is your body’s way of flushing out the system. This process isn’t pleasant for allergy sufferers, and even potentially carries mild threats to your eye health. If […]

Glaucoma Surgery Recovery

Glaucoma is a term used for a group of eye conditions that cause damage to the optic nerve due to an increase in intraocular pressure. If left untreated, glaucoma can cause complete vision loss. When drug therapies and medications fail or are inappropriate, surgical treatment may be required. There are two types of surgical techniques used in glaucoma treatment: laser surgery and conventional filtering microsurgery. Although there is no cure for glaucoma, surgery may stabilize vision and prevent future vision loss. Below is an overview of what to expect during glaucoma surgery recovery.

Recovery from Laser Glaucoma Surgery

Laser surgery is a highly effective treatment option for glaucoma patients. This type of […]

Macular Degeneration – Dry

Macular degeneration is a condition that affects the central part of the retina and results in distortion or loss of central vision. It commonly occurs in older adults and is often referred to as age-related macular degeneration. There are two type of age-related macular degeneration: wet and dry. Dry macular degeneration is the most common form of the disease and affects 90% of the people who have the condition.

In the dry form of macular degeneration, there is a breakdown or thinning of the layer of retinal pigment epithelial cells (RPE) in the macula. The macula is the part of the retina responsible for clear central vision. The RPE cells support […]