Types of Contact Lenses

There are three primary types of contact lenses. We’ll work closely with you to decide which material is the most appropriate for your lifestyle and individual needs.

1. Soft Contact Lenses

Soft contacts are made from a gel-like, water-based plastic. Soft lenses are the most common contacts used today.

2. Gas Permeable Contact Lenses

Also known as RGP or “oxygen permeable” lenses, these contacts are made from rigid, waterless plastics and are especially good for presbyopia and high astigmatism.

3. Hybrid Contact Lenses

These contacts feature an RGP center with a soft outer skirt, providing wearers with both the crisp optics of a rigid lens and the comfort of a larger, soft lens.

4. Scleral Contact Lenses

Scleral contact lenses functionally replace the irregular cornea with a smooth optical surface to correct vision problems caused by Keratoconus and other corneal irregularities.


There are a variety of contact lens designs that can help correct vision problems. Your doctor will carefully select the design that best fits your visual needs.

Spherical Contact Lenses

Standard lenses that are used for correcting nearsightedness (myopia) or farsightedness (hyperopia).

Toric Contact Lenses

These lenses have more than one curvature angle, allowing them to correct for astigmatism, as well as for nearsightedness and farsightedness.

Multi-Focal and Bi-focal Contact Lenses

Just like bi-focal glasses, these lenses contain different zones for near and far vision to correct presbyopia, a decreased ability to focus that occurs as the eye ages.

Corneal Refractive Therapy (CRT) Lenses

CRT lenses are specially designed to reshape the cornea during sleep, providing lens-free daytime wear.

Colored Lenses

In addition to correcting your vision, many contact lenses also come in colors that can enhance or change the natural color of your eyes. Ask for more information about colored contact lens options.

Buy contacts from the Experts

 


Get EyeSmart

Visit the American Academy of Opthalmology’s webpage on types of contact lenses.